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 2-pole, 220v smart switch?
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dstaley
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  7:44:36 PM  Show Profile  Send dstaley a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone,
This is my first post, my boss suggested I look at Insteon/x10 when I was talking to him about considering automation/remote control of some electrical stuff in my new workshop.

I have a detached garage (pole barn construction) with 220v, 100A service from my home. I'm installing some PA22 metal halide 220v lighting in 4 zones, and I'd like to be able to shut them off from the house on occasion. Ordinarily, I'd just install 2-pole, 220V switches for these, but if I want to control them remotely I guess I'll need some kind of equivalent Insteon or x10 switch. It is my understanding that I'll need to kill both hot wires in order to meet regular code, which I'd like to stick to. Are two-pole, 220v switches available for this system? I have failed to find them so far, so any help you can provide would be much appreciated. If I go with four of them, they would not need to be rated for more than 10A.

jdale
Advanced Member

USA
1205 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  7:53:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit jdale's Homepage  Reply with Quote
At worst, you could use the 220V Load Controller http://www.smarthome.com/2477SA1/INSTEON-220V-240V-30-AMP-Load-Controller-Normally-Open-Relay-Dual-Band/p.aspx to directly control the lights, and then use any switch (SwitchLinc, KeypadLinc, RemoteLinc, etc) to control them from other locations. Only the Load Controller would be directly wired to the 220V service or the lights in that case.

Some of the newer SwitchLincs are rated up to 277VAC but I'm not sure whether they would be usable directly that way. There aren't two separate hot wires so it might not work. Someone else may be able to address that question.

Insteon FAQ: http://goo.gl/qNTNr
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stusviews
Advanced Member

USA
15854 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  8:21:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit stusviews's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You can use the 220/240/277 volt Insteon switches in locations that allow, according to code, only one leg of the 220/240 volt split, single-phase electric supply be disconnected, which is not the case in your situation.

The load controller suggested by jdale is appropriate and, IMO, ideal for your situation. You can place any Insteon controller (e.g., SwitchLinc, RemoteLinc, Tabletop enclosure, etc.) anywhere to control the 220 volt lighting, even next to your bed

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Geo
Advanced Member

Canada
815 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2012 :  05:29:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Heat pumps just as all HVAC systems (to my knowledge) are controlled by 24VAC.The control relays are connected to the common ground, usually designated by letter C and black wires. Different switches, such as thermostats, etc. provide power to energize the relays from "live" 24VAC designated with letter R and usually red wire. This makes those switches ORed.
You don't need to (and shouldn't) monkey around with 220VAC. All you need to do is use switch modules and drive relays to whatever function you need. You may want to enable the pump remotely, in which case you just add the switch module to drive the appropriate relays in parallel, or if you want to prevent the pump from running you add the switch module to disconnect the power.
Heat pumps are controlled by two wires: Usually yellow wire designated Y, when connected to R will make the compressor run. The other wire is called O, often violet color, controls the reverser valve - this makes the pump heat or cool/defrost. Some pumps use active high for heating, others active low. You need to measure the voltage on that wire when the pump is running. It's very simple.

GJN
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Geo
Advanced Member

Canada
815 Posts

Posted - 11/30/2012 :  05:30:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry. I posted it in a wrong place, although you may want to look at low voltage contactors.

GJN
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arin
Starting Member

1 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2012 :  12:27:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have you looked for Allan Bradley contactor??
They can control the 100 Amp at 220V.. Moreover, they are also 2-pole contactors..
So connect your control circuit with this one, and you will get the two pole output control. Here is the name of one type product.
Allen Bradley

Lighting Contactor

702L-DAJ92


http://www.7pcb.ca

Edited by - arin on 01/04/2013 2:36:02 PM
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Solraven
Starting Member

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 09/08/2020 :  12:37:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Why not just use a 120v coil contactor $10 and a cheap sonoff switch $8. you could put them directly in your electric panel, the sonoff switches power to the coil on the contactor, the contactor closes the circuit for both phases simultaneously. if you want a physical switch you can set up a remote switch hooked to nothing and run a ITTT to turn the sonoff on or off when the switch is pressed. you could even use this to set up switches at multiple locations like a front door and back door.
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